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Gorgeous and Crushable Rosés

In case you’ve been living under a rock, it’s rosé season! Some eager beavers like to welcome the pink drink when they swap out their winter coats for more spring-like attire. In BC, that can be as early as March! Others wait more conservatively until the Okanagan wineries release their new vintages. FYI, that’s happened already. So it’s time. Let’s find a patio, some sunglasses and a wide brimmed hat and dive into some of my favourite gorgeous and crushable rosés so far this season.

Evolve Pink Effervescence

We’re kicking off the list with an Okanagan Valley VQA bubble. Evolve Cellars’ Pink Effervescence is screaming for you to take its picture. It’s saying, “hey there, look at me, I’m pretty and I taste delicious too!” I’m not going to lie, when I poured it into my glass, it bubbled up like a can of soda. But it tempered quickly and I was very happy with what ended up being a conservative mousse on the palate. 

Made from mostly Pinot Blanc, the watermelon Jolly Rancher colour is coming exclusively from the 3% contribution of Merlot. Strawberries, peach and floral are what this wine is all about. Dry with tight acidity. Great as an aperitif and equally enjoyable with light fare. Perfect for an Insta-worthy Sunday brunch.

Evolve Pink Effervescence

Rivera Rosé Castel del Monte DOC

I’ve written about Rivera before, but this is the first chance I’ve had to taste their rosé. Made from 100% Bombino Nero, an indigenous grape from Puglia, this is a DOC quality wine for around $15. You really can’t beat the value. 

It’s bright, lively and fruit forward. Deliciously juicy with a crisp finish. It’ll make you want to pull out your phone and hashtag all the rosé clichés. Can I get a #yeswayrosé!

Rivera Rosé Castel del Monte DOC

Culmina Signée

What I love about Culmina is their creativity. This rosé is made from a portion of the juice that makes up their Bordeaux red varietals. 53% Merlot, 25% Malbec, 15% Cabernet Franc and 6% Cabernet Sauvignon. Have you ever tasted a Bordeaux style rosé? I sure as hell haven’t. 

From the Golden Mile Bench in BC, all varietals were grown on estate land owned by Canadian wine industry icon, Don Triggs. A slightly earthier rendition of a more traditional Okanagan rosé, the fruit is still bright (think more rhubarb and pomegranate rather than strawberry and cherry) with a rich elegance and lingering finish. 

Culmina Signée

Santos da Casa Douro Rosé

I recently did a little recap of Portuguese wines and while this rosé got a brief nod, I wanted to expand upon it a bit more. The Santos da Casa is a blend of Touriga Nacional (one of the country’s most popular grapes) and Tinta Roriz (aka Temprnaillo). If you didn’t know already, I LOVE indigenous varietals. Any. And. All.

The label is what struck me to try it, but the crisp acidity and lovely profile is what kept me interested. Fresh strawberry is prominent, but it’s supported by a floral/rose structure. We’re not talking potpourri intensity; we’re talking subtle elegance and a light finish. Rounded and interesting.  Stunning.

Santos da Casa Douro Rosé

Narrative Rosé

The more I learn about the Okanagan’s Narrative wines, the more I want to learn. I mean this in a truly inquisitive wine geek sort of way. But I also mean this in a what-the-heck-is-in-this?sort of way. All that’s stated is that it’s a blend of red grapes from Summerland and Oliver. Do I need to know the exact composition? No. Do I want to know? Yes. 

Question marks aside, what’s most exciting about Narrative is the use of concrete tanks for fermentation. Concrete is becoming progressively more popular with producers around the world who are aiming to make more authentic wines. In this instance, it allows the natural red berry flavours to shine but it also adds a lovely textural component. It’s multi layered with some herbal notes peeking through near the finish. 

Narrative Rosé

Do you have a favourite rosé that you’re crushing on right now? New ones are always popping up for me on Instagram. Be sure to follow @socialsips to see what’s in my glass. Cheers!

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